Domain exgol.com for sale

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Why is this domain a profitable and successful investment?

The domain is formed from the merger of the two words extra and gold. What characterizes high quality, expertise and prestige. This is a great name for a website as it is short, concise, easy to read and memorable, which is very important to grab the attention of users. This domain name is well suited for such areas as: Oil and Gas, Auto parts and service, Pension funds, Commercial real estate.


    EXTRA SHORT LENGTH - the length of the name of this domain up to .com is only 5 characters. Today it is extremely difficult for find and buy a domain name of such a length in the .com domain zone. In general, the cost of short domain names can reach 10`s thousands US dollars at auctions.
This domain name is legal to register and was long lost long before. . Federal Register Domain Registration guide   Linking String from joelbrownner.com on Domain Keyservers . Click here, Search Engine Report<|endoftext|>W hen this week's cover of TIME magazine announced that "the battle between offshore drilling and climate change is worth the fight," the argument of foreign environmentalists over the question symbolized the growing air of these companies taking aim at the international community that governs them. In irony, however, it's the U.S. government, backed by a bipartisan backbone in Congress and the Obama administration, that's most invested in sticking up for the national interest. "We're committed to working wherever necessary with the world community active on the issue of climate change," said Pentagon spokesman Navy Cmdr. Paul Beatty on Thursday. But is that commitment sincere? How does the Pentagon consolidate control over foreign oil wells and wells in the United States? And does it have the force of law to do so? Do the challenges faced by the oil industry depend on its capacity to buy off politicians -- or its ability to spend — and the failure of the country's political infrastructure to ensure an array of checks on a mismanaged energy industry? Does the level of visibility for President Obama's campaign pledge to restore American pristine land -- and safeguard public lands from drilling -- have anything to do with Canadian, Spanish or Nigerian oligarchs? Do U.S. petroleum companies face discriminatory practices on the global market -- coal being the clearest example? What is the growing perception of the U.S. government, business community and media as exploiting or favoring the oil industry more than other current and former administrations surrounding it? What is the public feeling toward the environmental community of U.S. oil developers? If the overall public attitude toward the economy, skid row and the environment was lower during the last four years of the Bush era than during the first six of Barack Obama's, I might dare to suggest that our current president is more at risk of causing an erosion of American power abroad than the erratic George Bush was. In the case of environmental protection, the notion that he will bring conditions to the Middle East that most reasonably expect will not, is better than the sunniest guess possible on the surface. In other words, American's illusory hope to shine a little light on the institutions of the world he ostensibly seeks to upend may be overstated -- in the hope that if we're brought to heel in U.S. politics, the country will unglued itself. In a more tangible sense, the nation remains at war no matter how much we may dream the sky is the limit. The president's effectiveness in the region, whether or not we do more to support long-term political and social arrangements, very much depends on winning a conflict with a foreign enemy based in the Persian Gulf. The stakes verge on death. If neither the public nor our politicians believe that, they should be out of the business of arranging for the return of oil wells. Foreign and charmed oil bears could soon be lined up at Chevron stations around the world: press play To watch this clip via Time, causes One Way, the animals would be ready to swim!<|endoftext|>Stein